Tuesday, December 16, 2008

Open mic

At my last doctor appointment, I was advised that the time has come to up my office visits from once a month to every two weeks. Based on past experiences, I am thrilled to have this opportunity. So, I know that this every-two-weeks things means the end is quickly drawing near.
(Not that I would know when exactly the end will be because I am Mrs. RottenMotherAlready.)

I guess I'd better start getting ready.

So, all you pregnancy-gurus out there (you know who you are), tell me about childbirthing classes. Do I need them? What would you recommend? The hospital offers Lamaze classes but there are private instructors in town that offer other methods, for a price. I'm not planning to try a natural or low-med birth or anything crazy like that, so would it still be of value to take classes?

I've been told I have a low pain-tolerance so I'm open to anything that minimizes the pain.

Discuss.

6 comments:

Lorene said...

Andrea, the classes do not lessen the pain, they just make you understand it in order for you to focus on something else, relax, and not work against your own body by fighting the pain. Now that I've told you that, you don't need the classes!!

Beth said...

I was scheduled to take a class, but my daughter came a little early and was born before I was able to take it. I don't think it was a big deal, but the guy who gave me the epidural did say, "uh, you never took a class, did you." So I must have been doing something wrong. I think I wasn't breathing right or something. Anyway, I never took a class with my other kids because I figured if I managed just fine with out a class the first time, I'd be fine the other times. I don't want to tell you not to do it though. It certainly doesn't hurt. And by taking a class you might avoid weird comments from your epidural guy. But that's no guarantee.

momodafoxes4 said...

Naaaaaaaaaaaaah....just get a book on the method that interests you most...like ma Fox said...they don't lessen the pain..I would know too..but it helped me to understand what my body was doing and about how long I could expect to be doing whatever stage I was in. One word of warning however..most hospitals do not like to give you the epidural before 4 cm's of dilation, so some distraction techniques might be necessary. I always found that having Rob brush my hair for me calmed me immensely. I did the Bradley method with my first two,and I plan on using it again with this one...but I REALLY suck at visualizing, which is a main concept of their method. Rob is just a really good coach when it comes time. I also liked to be in a really warm tub or shower in the early stages, that helps to relax you a little...oh no..look at me go! If you want more little tidbits, you are going to either have to call me, or find me on Facebook! I'm afraid I'll use up all your storage space on here if I am just let loose like this....

Star said...

Since I have never had kids, I don't really know, but I have read PLENTY! The best thing that those classes teach (which has already been mentioned) is relaxation and breathing through the pain. If you sing, you know how to breathe from your diaphram, and deep breathing is good. Ask my mom; she had all three of us med- free and she is a voice teacher! A correllation there, eh? Good advice to get some books or look up online...

*

Karin said...

okay, so you don't really need to take a class to figure out how to birth a baby. :-) Since I was on strict bedrest, I didn't take a class until Buggy and then it was only because the class was given for free from my doula as part of her services. That being said, you will know better what to expect if you arm yourself with *correct* information. If you learn best by osmosis (and want your husband to leanr with you) it may be better in a class setting. Especially if you are super social. If you take in info alone and don't mind non-fiction, get some books. If your love your computer, there are some online classes and even a few that are free (I have some links somewhere in my stuff). I've done a little of all three and tons of reading. You should also know the leanings of birht methods so you will be awars when the teacher says stuff...such as Lamaze teachers are usually nurses and any class taken at the hospital will have "how to be a good patient" among it's major lesson plans. Bradley birthers lean on the dad a bunch-he's supposed to be the coach, so if that's not a role he freely embraces, be aware. Hypnobirthers will sometimes ask you to do hokey things like hang a sign on the hospital door that says "quiet, we're birthing a baby" and other silly stuff.

Do what feels right to you. Being a singer, I couldn't think that lamaze would be right for me. Bradley was not right for my husband, one doula even made me personal classes based on several methods and that was so amazingly helpful. Learning (by lots of reading from sources I trusted) helped me realize that I needed to surrender to the power that is birth and be relaxed so my my mind didn't fight my body. You don't need a ckass to have an epidural, but having a baby is a big deal that women should be prepared for. Talk to women who had good births and stay away from women who had yucky ones. Horror stories are not what you need right now. Pain tolerance level is not always associated with being able to brith well. I too have a *very low* pain tolerance level, but what I feel in birth is not pain (unless my body is telling me to move).

Sorry, I wrote a novel, but you asked. :-) I'll get off my soapbox now. Do what feels right to you and your husband. Pray about it and get prepared, whatever your plans may be. It will be wonderful! I have a favortie quote and it is "There is a secret in our society and it's not that birth is painful. It's that women are powerful." I truly believe that. Good luck in your preparations! :-)

Kari said...

Heh, fortunately I have nothing of value to offer you about the topic of birthing. *blink*blink*